Smithsonian PostSecret Exhibition Ending Soon

The PostSecret exhibit at the US Postal Museum is closing in December.
Location: Washington, DC
Price: Free
Details: https://goo.gl/FsCmfs

—Email—
Dear Frank,
I’ve been following and reading PostSecret since 2006. I’ve purchased and read the books, I saw you at a PostSecret Live! event in my town, I’ve sent you many of my own secrets, had the iPhone app (for a very short time), followed you on social media and FINALLY made it to the PostSecret exhibit.

I knew I would enjoy the secrets, but I was so surprised at how moved I was. I felt like I could actually feel the secrets. I could see the ridges on the stamps, the wear and tear from the secrets traveling through the mail system, the layers and layers of art, the pen marks from the writing, BOTH sides of the secret and even what appeared to be tears of sadness on one secret. I was so moved by the exhibit because I felt closer than ever to the people sharing their secrets. I am thrilled that this project is still thriving after all these years.

—Email—
Frank-
I went to D.C. last week and the ONLY thing I absolutely had to do was to go and see your exhibit at the Smithsonian National Postal Museum. I’ve been reading alongside you since 2005 – fifteen at the time! – and it has been a staple of my Sunday routine since then… A way to mark the beginning of a new week by remembering the humanity in others and by being reminded that I am not alone,
world at its darkest or lightest. I’ve come to your events in western and eastern Kentucky and both have affirmed for me how critical the conversations this project has started is. And I was reminded again at the museum.

I read every single secret and before I left I stopped to look at another panel again. I realized I hadn’t read it as I’d thought! I get to the bottom of the glass panel and I’m dumbstruck. I could swear I wrote this, could swear it’s my handwriting – a sixteen-year-old version of myself reflected in the penmanship.

—Email—
Dear Frank-
The most joyful part of the Smithsonian exhibit for me was reading my postcard, it was like seeing a friend who had passed away. If you would have explained the circumstances of which I’d see the secret again to that 18yr old girl [being in love, having an amazing career, well traveled, college educated,etc.] she would have laughed through her sadness as a complete impossibility. But alas, so many amazing things have happened in that time frame and it gave me renewed hope in myself – the bad times WILL pass. I hope the world continues to hear my voice while the postcard is on display, and furthermore I hope it impacts even one person to know that sadness isn’t forever. Happiness is within your grasp. Thank you Frank-for helping this full circle come to life.

–Email—
Frank-
I went to D.C. last week and the ONLY thing I absolutely had to do was to go and see your exhibit at the Smithsonian National Postal Museum. I’ve been reading alongside you since 2005 – fifteen at the time! – and it has been a staple of my Sunday routine since then… A way to mark the beginning of a new week by remembering the humanity in others and by being reminded that I am not alone,
world at its darkest or lightest. I’ve come to your events in western and eastern Kentucky and both have affirmed for me how critical the conversations this project has started is. And I was reminded again at the museum.

I read every single secret and before I left I stopped to look at another panel again. I realized I hadn’t read it as I’d thought! I get to the bottom of the glass panel and I’m dumbstruck. I could swear I wrote this, could swear it’s my handwriting – a sixteen-year-old version of myself reflected in the penmanship.

And well, isn’t that the point of PostSecret?
If there’s any way to know, I would love to know if this is from Kentucky (it was one of the only ones covered on the back by another postcard), but the amazing thing is is that even if it’s not mine, it’s still mine.

I received therapy for the first time around age 17 (the first my family could afford it), but it was only because I was exposed to the idea of asking for help, because I learned that I didn’t have to be alone. We could only manage to pay for a few sessions, but it was a start – and the beginning of a journey in self-care and self-advocacy that has been enduring since.

Classic Secrets

—Email—

Frank/PostSecret team:

I’m a college English professor in Southern California. I came across your first book years ago and fell in love with your idea. And when I started teaching, I decided to do it with my students as an opening assignment at the start of the semester. In your book intro, it says that every secret has a story behind it, so I use that for my first unit as we write narratives. The students take the secrets revealed by their peers and turn them into stories and poems.

What I do is give everyone a 4×6 index card that they must use to convey their secret. Upon the due date, all of the student put their secrets on their desk face down, and I collect them entirely anonymously. I always participate and include my secret in the stack as well. Then I shuffle and re-pass them back out so all the students share a secret (that is not their own).

And wow, what a powerful activity it is class after class. We’ve had funny ones, heartbreaking ones, life changing ones, etc. We’ve lent support to those suffering with depression, childhood trauma, we’ve celebrated sobriety and life changing decisions, we’ve laughed over embarrassing moments and silly confessions, and connected over our similar and shameful feelings. They take the assignment very seriously, and this creates a bonded community so early in the semester.

Anyways, I just wanted to share. We are hoping to come to the event at the Richard and Karen Carpenter Center in Long Beach. We can’t wait!!